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What UX Designers do goes Beyond UI Design

“User Experience Design” is often used interchangeably with terms such as “User Interface Design” and “Usability”. However, while usability and user interface (UI) design are important aspects of UX design, they are subsets of it – UX design covers a vast array of other areas, too. A UX designer is concerned with the entire process of acquiring and integrating a product, including aspects of branding, design, usability and function. It is a story that begins before the device is even in the user’s hands.

“No product is an island. A product is more than the product. It is a cohesive, integrated set of experiences. Think through all of the stages of a product or service – from initial intentions through final reflections, from first usage to help, service, and maintenance. Make them all work together seamlessly.”


— Don Norman, inventor of the term “User Experience”

Products that provide great user experience (e.g., the iPhone) are thus designed with not only the product’s consumption or use in mind but also the entire process of acquiring, owning and even troubleshooting it. Similarly, UX designers don’t just focus on creating products that are usable; we concentrate on other aspects of the user experience, such as pleasure, efficiency and fun, too. Consequently, there is no single definition of a good user experience. Instead, a good user experience is one that meets a particular user’s needs in the specific context where he or she uses the product.


X Designers consider the Why, What and How of Product Use

As a UX designer, you should consider the Why, What and How of product use. The Why involves the users’ motivations for adopting a product, whether they relate to a task they wish to perform with it or to values and views which users associate with the ownership and use of the product. The What addresses the things people can do with a product—its functionality. Finally, the How relates to the design of functionality in an accessible and aesthetically pleasant way. UX designers start with the Why before determining the What and then, finally, the How in order to create products that users can form meaningful experiences with. In software designs, you will need to ensure the product’s “substance” comes through an existing device and offers a seamless, fluid experience.


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When we think about 2050 it seems like it is ages from now and we imagine a completely different world, but in reality, it is just 30 years from now and we can already know what will be possible to have by that time. We have a lot of environmental, social problems and let’s see how technology may solve them by 2050. Today’s article is about tech of the future!

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Before writing this article, I did a small research and checked what industry influencers think about this topic, for example Mr Kurzweil, Business Insider, Forbes, etc.

Let’s start with Ray Kurzweil – the world’s foremost futurist, authoring bestsellers like “The Age of Spiritual Machines” and “How to Create a Mind.” He’s so influential that Google hired him to lead its artificial intelligence efforts. He is very well known for making predictions, which are right about 86% of the time.

 

Tech of the future: technology predictions for our world in 2050

 

  • Nanobots will plug our brains straight into the cloud

Tech of the future: nanobots. He believes, that by the 2050, nanobots will plug our brains straight into the cloud, it will give us full immersion virtual reality from within the nervous system. Just like we do know with our smartphones, we will be able to do it with our brains, we’ll be able to expand our neocortex in the cloud. And forget about memory problems, evidence problems, etc.

 

  • People reincarnation through AI

Sounds scary, I know! And probably most of the religious people will be very against it, however, 

Kurzweil says that we will be able to “bring back” our relatives through artificial intelligence. 

He says that by 2050, we’ll be able to send nanobots into people’s brains to extract memories of loved ones. Augment that with a DNA sampling of the deceased, and it will be possible to create a convincing virtual version of somebody who’s passed on. If you are interested in it, there is a movie about it: the discovery.

 

  • AI will become a positive net job motivator

Many people worry about AI in our lives as they think that at the end robots will replace people and we won’t have jobs for is. But. according to Forbes, In 2020, AI will become a positive net job motivator, creating 2.3M jobs while eliminating only 1.8M jobs. And we are talking about 2020, just in 2 years, so let’s see what opportunities it can bring us in 30 years.

 

  • IoT technology will change product designs

According to Forbes, by 2020, IoT technology will be in 95% of electronics for new product designs. And by 2050 it is expected to have everything connected to the cloud and to the internet.

 

  • Space tourism: a week in orbit

According to Business Insider, Space tourism could be feasible in 2050, but likely only for the very wealthy. Rocket companies like Jeff Bezo’s Blue Origin and Elon Musk’s SpaceX will push the envelope with space travel enough that tourism will be feasible in the year 2050. For example, “someone who could afford to pay 100 million quid could spend a week in orbit… but it would only be for rich people in 2050.” he said. “It’s not going to be something that’s cheap anytime soon.”

 

  • Self-driving cars will make driving safer

Despite the crashes involving self-driving cars that have hit the headlines these years, this area of AI could dramatically reduce deaths and injuries on our roads. According to a report by Stanford University, not only will self-driving cars reduce traffic related deaths and injuries, but they could bring about changes in our lifestyles as well. We will have more time for ourselves.

Also, the increased comfort and decreased cognitive load with self-driving cars and shared transportation may affect where people choose to live.

 

  • Charge your iphone with the power of a plant

Did you know that you can charge your iphone with the power of a plant? Forests can become the energy stations of the future. Now it is becoming possible, for example, Bioo is a clean-tech company capable of generating electricity from plant’s photosynthesis. Here you can watch a video to know more about it.

 

  • Ocean Thermal Energy can take us to 100% renewable-energy

Ocean thermal energy, is a largely untapped resource, and one of the world’s largest renewable energy sources. For example, right now Bluerise is working on creating an energy breakthrough by generating utility scale electricity through Ocean thermal energy conversion. It will be able to outcompete fossil fuel based generation and other renewables that require storage and grid balancing. It will play a crucial role in the future energy mix being one of the very few constant energy sources, available day and night, year-round.

 

  • EU will face a shortage of 800,000 IT workers by 2020

There is a huge demand for developers in Europe, yet most IT education is solely available in English. With 24 official languages spoken in Europe alone, it’s no surprise that non-native English speakers prefer to learn in their own language. However you can start seeing many coding academies, schools and universities focused only on training junior developers for specific companies’ demand, being it a language, a practice, etc. Even though this problem won’t be solved by 2020, with these new IT universities and academies, we can fix the situation by 2050.

 

  • Drone solution for discovering untouched places

Deep in underground mines, some zones are inaccessible. But company like Inkonova started to work on builds drones that fly, drive and climb and use laser technology to scan zones, and create a 3D map of them. With this advancing aerial robotics technology we will be able to push human reach to any space untouched by man-made infrastructure.

 

  • Half of current jobs in the world are unlikely to exist in 2050

The world is changing faster than we think and the way we learn things and what we learn should be changed. Employers should create an engaging learning culture at work by empowering their staff to take ownership of their professional development. Read more about it here


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A virtual private network (VPN) gives you online privacy and anonymity by creating a private network from a public internet connection. VPNs mask your internet protocol (IP) address so your online actions are virtually untraceable. Most important, VPN services establish secure and encrypted connections to provide greater privacy than even a secured Wi-Fi hotspot.


Why do you need a VPN service?

Surfing the web or transacting on an unsecured Wi-Fi network means you could be exposing your private information and browsing habits. That’s why a virtual private network, better known as a VPN, should be a must for anyone concerned about their online security and privacy.

Think about all the times you’ve been on the go, reading emails while in line at the coffee shop, or checking your bank account while waiting at the doctor’s office. Unless you were logged into a private Wi-Fi network that requires a password, any data transmitted during your online session could be vulnerable to eavesdropping by strangers using the same network.

The encryption and anonymity that a VPN provides helps protect your online activities: sending emails, shopping online, or paying bills. VPNs also help keep your web browsing anonymous.


How a VPN protects your IP address and privacy

VPNs essentially create a data tunnel between your local network and an exit node in another location, which could be thousands of miles away, making it seem as if you’re in another place. This benefit allows online freedom, or the ability to access your favorite apps and websites while on the go.

Here’s a closer look at how a virtual private network works. VPNs use encryption to scramble data when it’s sent over a Wi-Fi network. Encryption makes the data unreadable. Data security is especially important when using a public Wi-Fi network, because it prevents anyone else on the network from eavesdropping on your internet activity.

There’s another side to privacy. Without a VPN, your internet service provider knows your entire browsing history. With a VPN, your search history is hidden. That’s because your web activity will be associated with the VPN server’s IP address, not yours. A VPN service provider may have servers all over the world. That means your search activity could appear to originate at any one of them. Keep in mind, search engines also track your search history, but they’ll associate that information with an IP address that’s not yours. Again, your VPN will keep your activity private.


VPN Privacy: What does a VPN hide?

A VPN can hide a lot of information that can put your privacy at risk. Here are five of them.

1. Your browsing history

It’s no secret where you go on the internet. Your internet service provider and your web browser have a record of just about everything you do on the internet. A lot of websites you visit also keep a history. Web browsers can track your search history and tie that information to your IP address.

Here are two examples why you may want to keep your browsing history private. Maybe you have a medical condition and you’re searching the web for information about treatment options. Guess what? Without a VPN, you’ve automatically shared that information and may start receiving targeted ads that could draw further attention to your condition.

Or maybe you just want to price airline tickets for a flight next month. The travel sites you visit know you’re looking for tickets and they might display fares that aren’t the cheapest available.

These are just a few isolated examples. Keep in mind your internet service provider may be able to sell your browsing history. Even so-called private browsers are not so private.

2. Your IP address and location

Anyone who captures your IP address can access what you’ve been searching on the internet and where you were located when you searched. Think of your IP address as the return address you’d put on a letter. It leads back to your device.

Since a VPN uses an IP address that’s not your own, it allows you to maintain your privacy and search the web anonymously. You’re also protected against having your search history gathered, viewed, or sold.

3. Your location for streaming

You might pay for streaming services that enable you to watch things like professional sports. When you travel outside the country, the streaming service may not be available. Not so with a VPN — it allows you to select an IP address in your home country. In effect, you’re protected from losing access to something you’re paying for. You may also be able to avoid data or speed throttling, as well.

4. Your devices

A VPN can protect your devices, including desktop computer, laptop, tablet, and smart phone from prying eyes. Your devices can be prime targets for cybercriminals when you access the internet, especially if you’re on a public Wi-Fi network. In short, a VPN helps protect the data you send and receive on your devices so hackers won’t be able to watch your every move.

5. Your web activity — to maintain internet freedom

Hopefully, you’re not a candidate for government surveillance, but who knows. Remember, a VPN protects against your internet service provider seeing your browsing history. So you’re protected if a government agency asks your internet service provider to supply records of your internet activity. Assuming your VPN provider doesn’t log your browsing history (some VPN providers do), your VPN can help protect your internet freedom.

How can a VPN help protect against identity theft?

Identity theft occurs when thieves steal your personal information and use it to commit crimes in your name — like taking over or opening new accounts, filing tax returns in your name, or renting or buying property. A VPN can help protect against identity theft by helping protect your data. It creates an encrypted tunnel for the data you send and receive that’s out of reach of cyberthieves.

Consider: One in four people have experienced identity theft.

If your smartphone's Wi-Fi is enabled at all times, your device could be vulnerable without you ever knowing it. Everyday activities like online shopping, banking and browsing can expose your information, making you vulnerable to cybercrime.

A VPN can protect the information you share or access using your devices. That’s especially important when using a public Wi-Fi network, where a cyberthief on the same network can capture your login credentials and the credit card number you type in when you shop online.

You can’t prevent identity theft. No one can. Some security aspects — like a data breach at an organization where you have an account — are out of your control. But at least a VPN can safeguard your information on your devices.

 

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Norton Secure VPN helps prevent companies from tracking your online activities or location by encrypting your information on our no-log VPN.


What should you look for in VPN services?

The VPN market is crowded with options, so it’s important to consider your needs when you’re shopping for a VPN.

Think about what is important to you. Do you want to be able to surf the web anonymously by masking your IP address? Are you afraid that your information could be stolen on public Wi-Fi? Are you a frequent traveler who wants to be able to watch your favorite shows while you’re on the go.

A good VPN will check all three boxes, but here are some other points to consider.


How to choose a VPN

The best way to stay secure when using public Wi-Fi is to use a VPN solution. But what’s the best way to choose a virtual private network? Here are some questions to ask when you’re choosing a VPN provider.

  1. Do they respect your privacy? The point of using a VPN is to protect your privacy, so it’s crucial that your VPN provider respects your privacy, too. They should have a no-log policy, which means that they never track or log your online activities.
  2. Do they run the most current protocol? OpenVPN provides stronger security than other protocols, such as PPTP. OpenVPN is an open-source software that supports all the major operating systems.
  3. Do they set data limits? Depending on your internet usage, bandwidth may be a large deciding factor for you. Make sure their services match your needs by checking to see if you’ll get full, unmetered bandwidth without data limits.
  4. Where are the servers located? Decide which server locations are important to you. If you want to appear as if you’re accessing the Web from a certain locale, make sure there’s a server in that country.
  5. Will you be able to set up VPN access on multiple devices? If you are like the average consumer, you typically use between three and five devices. Ideally, you’d be able to use the VPN on all of them at the same time.
  6. How much will it cost? If price is important to you, then you may think that a free VPN is the best option. Remember, however, that some VPN services may not cost you money, but you might “pay” in other ways, such as being served frequent advertisements or having your personal information collected and sold to third parties. If you compare paid vs. free options, you may find that free VPNs:
  • don’t offer the most current or secure protocols
  • don’t offer the highest bandwidth and connection speeds to free users
  • do have a higher disconnection rate
  • don’t have as many servers in as many countries globally
  • don’t offer support

There are many points to consider when you’re choosing a VPN, so do your homework to make sure you’re getting the best fit for your needs. Regardless of which provider you choose, rest assured that a good VPN will provide more security, privacy, and anonymity online than a public Wi-Fi hotspot can.